News

Lab celebrates anniversary of looking below the surface

on November 24, 2016

For researchers at Surface Science Western, a surface profilometer, a dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometer and a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray capabilities have been all in a day’s work for the last 35 years.

The consulting and research laboratory specializes in the analysis and characterization of surfaces and materials. This year, the lab marks 35 years of helping high-profile clients across a range of industry sectors, including energy, mineral resources, health services, automotive, aerospace, environmental and electronics, to name a few.

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Fellowship pushes boundaries of medical technologies

on November 17, 2016

The Western Medical Innovation Fellowship was the best thing that could have happened to John Matheson.

“Medical residency was always the goal, but this program is going to be invaluable for my future as a clinician,” he said. “You don’t get the opportunity to stop your clinical training and basically be offered this chance to just innovate for a year.”

As a recent medical school graduate, Matheson is one of the program’s three inaugural fellows. Created in partnership with the Western Bone and Joint’s Collaborative Training Program in Musculoskeletal Health, the 10-and-a-half-month fellowship focuses on developing new medical technologies.

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Western and Lawson scientists develop game-changing blood test for concussions

on November 8, 2016
LONDON, ON – Scientists from Children’s Health Research Institute, a program of Lawson Health Research Institute, and Western University have developed a new blood test that identifies with greater than 90 per cent certainty whether or not an adolescent athlete has suffered a concussion.

Diagnosis of a clinically significant concussion, or a mild traumatic brain injury, can be difficult as it currently relies on a combination of patient symptom assessment and clinician judgement. Equally problematic are the decisions to stop play or activities, or when patients who have suffered a concussion can safely return to normal activities without risking further injury.

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St. Joseph’s Health Care: New research chairs announced

on November 3, 2016

London researcher Ting-Yim Lee is working toward what he calls a “next-generation” form of medical imaging.

Imagine a health-care professional treating a stroke patient. Imagine technology that can deliver three maps of the patient’s brain showing where the blood is still flowing and what portions of the brain already have been damaged. Now imagine that the information about structural changes in the patient’s brain come in such a simple form, it can be interpreted by virtually anyone. And imagine it can all be done in a matter of minutes, saving crucial time that could mean the difference between life and death.

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Western Oncology, Biochemistry and Surgery professor Eva Turley, right, and Chemistry and Oncology professor Len Luyt have received the 2016 WORLDiscoveries Vanguard Award for Innovator(s) of the Year for their work with the RHAMM protein in finding treatments for a variety of inflammatory conditions including bronchopulmonary dysplasia in premature infants, arthritis and emphysema.

Protein exploration earns Vanguard Award

on October 27, 2016

Since graduate school, Eva Turley has been interested in how and why cells move in our bodies. This curiosity led to her discovering, characterizing and cloning RHAMM, a protein that regulates cell movement and stem cell differentiation, during the early 1980s.

Fast forward to the present day.

The Western Oncology, Biochemistry and Surgery professor, along with Chemistry and Oncology professor Len Luyt, has determined that blocking RHAMM provides the safest and most effective means to, among other things, selectively stimulate fat growth under the skin, moderate inflammation and reduce scarring by controlling the body’s own natural regenerative processes. This is good news for millions of patients, ranging from premature babies to breast cancer survivors.

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Western University: Unexpected discovery leads researchers to develop super-thin material to store data

on October 21, 2016

In a discovery that owes as much to serendipity as science, Western University researchers have developed a thinner-than-thin polymer that could exponentially expand the memory storage of our computers and smartphones.

It is the tech industry’s and consumer’s dream: a virtual house-full of memory capability in a device smaller than a fingernail.

The polymer is made of organic material, rather than the silicon now used in flash drives, and can be stretched ridiculously thin — 10,000 times thinner than a human hair. In commercial application it could be used to help store undreamed-of volumes of data.

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Is it obvious? That’s a tricky question

on October 6, 2016

A patent is a bargain between an inventor and the public. In exchange for a limited commercial monopoly on the exploitation of an invention, the inventor agrees to teach the public how the invention works. It is no surprise, then, that an invention must be novel to acquire a patent – the public is not interested in trading for information that it already possesses. It should also be no surprise that a successful patent application will only occur where an invention was not obvious, and only where the invention is useful. The public is not interested in trading for knowledge that is obvious, or that has no use. As such, an invention must be novel and unobvious and useful in order to successfully acquire patent protection.

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Reminder – Vanguard Awards Approaching!

on September 21, 2016
WORLDiscoveries® is pleased to present our annual Vanguard Awards on September 22nd 2016 at Windermere Manor, located in the Western Research Park. The Vanguard Awards are dedicated to celebrating researchers who, through partnership with WORLDiscoveries®, have achieved various market-readiness milestones.

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Western Receives $66 Million Federal Grant For Brain Research

on September 9, 2016

Western University’s BrainsCAN initiative received a substantial $66 million investment from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund (CFREF) today – the largest research grant in the university’s history – providing a significant boost to ongoing research in cognitive neuroscience and imaging at Western.

Already ranked amongst the best in the world in cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging, Western excels in the breadth of cognitive, computational, clinical, technological, and translational approaches required for understanding and intervening in brain function.

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New medical technology from Western drives Precision Proteomics launch

on September 7, 2016

TORONTO, Ontario – Precision Proteomics, a pre-clinical stage biotechnology company commercializing a novel precision medicine platform, announced its launch today.

The company will focus on accelerating the development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics based on groundbreaking proteomics technology pioneered by Shawn Li, PhD, an oncology professor and researcher at Western University’s Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry.

Proteomics is the large-scale study of proteins, particularly their structures and functions. This new precision medicine platform focuses on the development of novel diagnostics to enable more precise utilization of therapies, and novel cancer therapeutics to overcome resistance.

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